I love the smell of pesto

To teach is to learn twice. Joseph Joubert

pesto before
before

How do you make pesto? Lot’s of people know – I’ve even done it myself. Still, it’s great to have a chance to revise. And the scent of fresh picked Basil …


new beginning

The boys arrived yesterday. It’s raining cats and dogs this morning. Pesto supply is low. We decided to find a recipe and take it from there, so … onto the Internet.


calling all experts

trimmed basil
Basil

Unlike people who don’t like experts, we do. I posted on Facebook and soon helpers appeared. Thanks friends.


makings

  1. pine nuts (approx 50 gm)
  2. basil (approx 50 gm)
  3. parmesan (approx 150 gm)
  4. garlic (4 cloves)
  5. olive (or Scottish) rapeseed oil (approx 175 gm)
  6. quality salt to taste (I prefer Maldon or similar)

sidetrack …

We needed pine nuts and received a shopping list into the bargain. After that, a pit stop happened. Then we were back on the case.


make pesto

The key part was:

  • roast the pine nuts, I use a small pan – it makes tossing stuff about easy … (singe, toss, singe some more, taste, toss if necessary and so on)
  • pick basil

The rest is common sense. I use a whizzer AKA blender (mortar and pestle works too – messier – fun too). Making pesto goes something like this:

  1. Put oil in blender bowl
  2. Add leaves and press gently into bowl (mine all fitted)
  3. Whizz oil and leaves
  4. Add garlic and whizz
  5. Add pine nuts and whizz
  6. Add parmesan and whizz
  7. Add salt and whizz
  8. Fill jar(s)

Pesto in jarDon’t over-whizz. If you want more chunky leaf pieces put basil leaves in last. Some fresh bread is an ideal tool to check the taste -blip- check the taste -blip- check the taste -blip- check the taste …


A Facebook pal reminded me to ensure plenty of oil is covering our finished pesto.


You’re not done until you’ve cleaned up … interesting how young assistants evaporate before this point.

© Mac Logan